FRAMEWORK


1. NEW EU POLICIES


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The European Commission is implementing a strategy to improve the environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle. With this aim, the Commission has launched a number of policies such as the Integrated Product Policy (IPP), Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP), Sustainable Industrial Policy (SIP), and the Sustainable Use of Natural Resources.

These policies are supported by several instruments such as Green Public Procurement (GPP) and Product Environmental Footprint (PEF). In addition, the European Resource Efficiency Platform (EREP) has recently published a proposal for the introduction of a Product Passport.

These instruments and policies aim at effectively eliminating the ambiguities between an accurate and misleading declaration of the term «green».
GPP PEF PP

GPP - Green Public Procurement

Green Public Procurement (GPP) is defined as "a process whereby public authorities seek to procure goods, services and works with a reduced environmental impact throughout their life cycle" (Communication (COM (2008) 400) Public procurement for a better environment).

The GPP is a strategic instrument within the European environmental policies framework.

"In some sectors, public purchasers command a large share of the market (e.g. public transport and construction, health services and education) and so their decisions have considerable impact." (Source: European Commission website)

The GPP approach seeks to

  • 1. Obtain quantified information concerning specific performance of a product
  • 2. Assess the received information with respect to reference values

PEF - Product Environmental Footprint

The Product Environmental Footprint (PEF) is a multi-criteria measure of the environmental performance of a good or sevice throughout its life cycle.
The PEF intends to address the lack of a common definition as to what a green product is.

The PEF establishes precise rules for the analysis of the environmental profile of a product.
This will lead to high data quality standards.

In particular the PEF aims to:

  • 1. Set common rules and indicators for measuring and reporting the environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle
  • 2. Enable comparisons between products of the same category
  • 3. Define benchmark values
  • 4. Establishes precise data quality requirements

Product Passport

The Product Passport is one of the proposals formulated by the European Resource Efficiency Platform (EREP).
It comprises a set of information about the components and materials that a product contains, and how they can be disassembled and recycled at the end of the product's useful life.

The Product Passport aims to:

  • 1. Improve transparency of product information
  • 2. Enhance market opportunities for greener products in the EU single market.

2. REFERENCE STANDARDS


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The ISO 14020 series consists of a set of voluntary standards providing businesses with globally recognized and reliable instruments, against which, environmental labelling and declarations can be defined.

By communicating verifiable, accurate and non-misleading information, environmental labels and declarations intend to encourage demand and supply of those products and services that cause less stress on the environment.

The nine principles Types of communication

The nine principles
Source: ISO 14020

The new environmental claim is based on the nine principles identified in the ISO 14020. These principles define the characteristics that environmental labels and declarations must include.


1 Accuracy and credibility
Environmental labels and declarations shall be accurate, verifiable, relevant and not misleading.
2 International trade
Procedures and requirements for environmental labels and declarations shall not be prepared, adopted, or applied with a view to, or with the effect of, creating unnecessary obstacles to international trade.
3 Scientific methodology
Environmental labels and declarations shall be based on scientific methodology that is sufficiently thorough and comprehensive to support the claim and that produces results that are accurate and reproducible.
4 Transparency on rules
Information concerning the procedure, methodology, and any criteria used to support environmental labels and declarations shall be available and provided upon request to all interested parties.
5 Life cycle approach
The development of environmental labels and declarations shall take into consideration all relevant aspects of the life cycle of the product.
6 Innovation
Environmental labels and declarations shall not inhibit innovation which maintains or has the potential to improve environmental performance.
7 Confidentiality
Any administrative requirements or information demands related to environmental labels and declarations shall be limited to those necessary to establish conformance with applicable criteria and standards of the labels and declarations.
8 Stakeholder engagement
The process of developing environmental labels and declarations should include an open, participatory consultation with interested parties. Reasonable efforts should be made to achieve a consensus throughout the process.
9 Transparency on data
Information on the environmental aspects of products and services relevant to an environmental label or declaration shall be available to purchasers and potential purchasers from the party making the environmental label or declaration.

three Types of communication

When combined, these tools provide complete and accurate communication. However, when taken individually, none of them are adequately exhaustive to meet all communication needs.



3. MARKET NEEDS


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Due to new demands arising from the market, a simple scheme of B to B (Business to Business), B to C (Business to Consumer) or B to G (Business to Government) communication is no longer sufficient.



An approach which is suitable for companies manufacturing products such as components, food, and innovative materials.
Materials Components Food

innovative materials

MATERIAL FLOW REQUEST FOR COMMUNICATION THE TOTAL ECO-CLAIM

1) The consumer asks for information about material performance.

1) The material manufacturer needs B to B communication.

2) The material manufacturer is also interested in managing communication to the consumer (B to C).

components

MATERIAL FLOW REQUEST FOR COMMUNICATION THE TOTAL ECO-CLAIM

1) A consumer interested in buying a house may ask for information about the windows’ performance.

2) A consumer re-furbishing his/her house, buys windows and asks for information about the performance of the product.

1) The company producing windows is interested in managing such communication by ensuring that suitable information is provided to the customer by the construction company (B to B plus B to C).

2) The company producing windows is interested in managing communication to the consumer (B to C).

food

MATERIAL FLOW REQUEST FOR COMMUNICATION THE TOTAL ECO-CLAIM

1) A consumer buying milk asks for information about the performance of the product.

1) Company producing milk provides information about the environmental performance of their milk to a company producing yogurt (B to B).

2) The company producing milk is interested in managing communication to the consumer (B to C).

Created and developed by
Studio Fieschi & True Flava